Why I’m Uploading 50 Plus Titles to Scribd & Oyster

12 Feb

Love's Travels - Vermont, Paris, Austin; © felipe adan lermaWhy I’m Uploading 50 Plus Titles to Scribd & Oyster

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Pictured Left :

Love’s Travels – Vermont Paris Austin

900 Word Poem.

14 Original Images.

Vermont, Paris, Austin.

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“the intent of this blog is to incrementally build a body of thought that works toward integrating various topics, yoga, fitness, and the arts – it’s a process…”

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Site Areas

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Fitness ** Arts ** eBooks

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Why I’m Uploading 50 Plus Titles to Scribd & Oyster

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Categories : Author Bio Info & UpdatesScribd

Previous Related Articles :

First Impression re Scribd & Oyster – I Like It!  And Why…

Update: First Impression re Scribd & Oyster – I Like It!  And Why…

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Intro

Hello!  Sunshine has returned to Central Texas today, and an 80 degree day is already on tap soon.

Also on tap, is the imminent availability of over 50 titles of my original fiction, poetry, and imagery work, on two subscription services – Scribe and Oyster Books.

The two links above detail some initial information, and links to sites that discuss various pros and cons of even being in or having an ebook subscription services

What I’ll do here in this post is, in three parts:

1) post a comment I made to an extremely important article on Joe Konrath’s blog about very important revelatory information about who (self-publishers) is making the most money with books -

2) do an imaginary question and answer about the hows and whys of choosing to post with Scribd and Oyster (based on actual conversations with people I know well and have known for a long time -

3) describe categories of my own original work, and how accessing them via an unlimited ebook subscription service, at least as proposed and being offered by both Oyster and Scribd, will be easier, more enjoyable, and probably less expensive.

Here we go ;-)

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[note : preview added 040814]

First, one quick preview (a nice feature via Scribd) -

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Part One

My Comment on Joe Konrath’s blog article : Me, Hugh Howey, and Legacy John on AuthorEarnings.com

http://jakonrath.blogspot.com/2014/02/me-hugh-howey-and-legacy-john-on.html

My comment :

Fantastic revelatory info – thank you!

So many good points, and as an impending participant in two new subscription services, Scribd and Oyster (books sent, awaiting listing) – I find most of the info as promising for subscriptions also for me as a reader and an author.

“Most readers don’t know and don’t care how the books they read are published. They just know if they liked the story and how much they paid.”

The profit model for the author, as per the article, seems to be a key component.

And as the latter element, “readers…how much they paid” becomes somewhat fixed, I think this will intensify.

“…those who fear that these titles will crowd out other books are ignoring the vast quantities of books published traditionally—or the fact that billions of self-published blogs and websites don’t impede our ability to browse the internet, to find what we are looking for, or to share discovered gems with others.” -

I think this also addresses fears many have (and I’ve had) that subscription services would flood our digital reading piles.

And with browsing allowed to be economically possible for a reader, more discoverability, for what a reader would like to read, also becomes possible.

“If I had to guess what the future holds, I would say that the world of literature has its brightest days still ahead…There will be casualties in the publishing industry as the delivery mechanisms for stories undergo change…But there are opportunities as well. And right now, the benefits are moving to the reader and the writer.”

Couldn’t agree more. Though I don’t sell much, at least vs what I hear so many others make, I make more than when I couldn’t have anything out for people to find or try.

“Hollywood studios had to capitulate to their writers when a new digital stream emerged.”

And I think this will be the key for subscription services, and goes back to the initial possible / probable reason self-publishing is working.

Industry innovator, no, actually almost literally, creator – Amazon, and now others, pay us a decent fair amount to create new content. It’s much what Henry Ford about a hundred years ago – paid his workers enough to have the money to buy the things they made. An idea evidently still being fought against today.

What a great article. Will become a standard starting point for truth for self-publishing.

Which really, once I think about it, is small business enterprise at its best.

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Part Two

Imaginary Question & Answer

Based on conversations about Scribd & Oyster with people close to me.

Q: I don’t want to join until your books are on there.

A: I understand.  My understanding this is happening 1-2 weeks from now.  Hopefully on both platforms.

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Q: How are you going to make any money this way?

A: The terms are, as they stand, good for me.  There are provisions for me to get partial credit for partial reads.

Plus, the amount read counting toward a purchase type pmt to me is cumulative, ie, you can take your time reading, when you want to, as fast or slow as you want to, over time, and if you enjoy nibbling at my work long enough, I’ll get paid.

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Q: What if I want to hold on to another book, and being reading it sometimes too?

A: For me, that’s one of the more attractive features about a subscription service.  I have (in my trial subscription time) several books “open” and that I go to on impulse.  Plus several more in my “library” to start reading anytime I’m ready.

If after reading a chapter or two, I don’t want to read anymore of that book, I can hold it in my reading list, or let it go.  If I change my mind later and want to browse through it again, and give it another try, it’ll be in my history.

I don’t extra to do this.  It’s part of my flat rate.

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Q: And if I run out of books to read?  Or don’t like the way the whole thing works?

A: From what I understand, and expect for myself as a reader, I can cancel anytime.  There’s no contract.  That would be a bummer.

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Q: I just don’t know if I’d read enough to be worth signing up.

A: As much as I read, I had the same fear.  After all, I need time, lots of time, to do creative work, play with the grandkids, do fun stuff with my wife, visit with family, watch TV, and sometimes, not as often as I like, just hang around.

But I had the trial period, even before I decided to upload some of my work, then eventually, all of it, onto Scribd and Oyster, and I found the same thing Sheila and I have found so great about Netflix (members nearly ten years), we can sample titles we wouldn’t have taken a chance with if we’d had to purchase them, and watch more movies now than we ever did.  From all over the world.

I’m finding the same thing happening with my reading choices.  But even more quickly.  I’m able and willing to peek into chapters of histories and other non-fiction at topics of interest.  I can read beginnings of books of authors I never heard of in books I didn’t know existed, as much as I want, until I find something that sticks.

The ease of exploration, like our movie searches on Netflix, is a huge positive factor for me.

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Q: I know I won’t read enough to pay even the $9 – $10 a month.

A: For me, that’s ok.  My work is still available on every major online outlet that will carry it: Amazon, iTunes, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Smashwords, Google, and more.

And I think there may be some titles, that some folk might like, that are worth “having.”

Maybe small books of verses to reread, or images to enjoy reviewing now and again.

Maybe preferring the audio book version, and listening to the narrative performance.

Or having a hard copy to hold and have.

And some folk, even using the subscription services, may even discover titles of mine this way, that they then would like to have an audio or print copy or even ebook version of, or give to to someone who isn’t on a subscription service.

Variety of availability, more than exclusiveness, has worked best for me.

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Part Three

Categories of My Work to Browse Through

Once my 50 plus titles are available on either or both Scribd and Oyster, I will do a new post detailing this general information more fully.

This will give a person an idea of how much they would have to game, just exploring my work.  Assuming they want to of course ;-)

My job is to hopefully at least entice you. :-)

But whether a reader likes fiction, short or long, stand alone or series, whether they might prefer poetry, in topics or collections, and whether images (of Paris, Vermont, Texas) are more appealing, I have something of all those.

Original work.

Sometimes, even after two years, updated with more information, links, and commentary – and a perspective gained in that time.

For updates on new material, please signup for my blog posts.  I don’t send you anything else, and actually WordPress sends out an email that there’s a new posting.

New Work

Meanwhile, I continue with new work.  The fun part :-)

Below is the cover for my next work (if all goes well!) -

A photo story of an event in Vermont that’s kept itself imprinted on both mine and Sheila’s memory for two years as of March 1st -

The arrival of the American Robins signalling spring is coming :

American Robins Arriving in Vermont med

Now available, on Scribd.

My Author Pages on major outlets.

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namaste´- con dios – god be with you

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Sheila & Adan

Sheila & Adan

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2 Responses to “Why I’m Uploading 50 Plus Titles to Scribd & Oyster”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Is Smashwords Opening the Door for Fiction Serials @ Scribd and Oyster? | Felipe Adan Lerma - February 24, 2014

    […] Why I’m Uploading 50 Plus Titles to Scribd & Oyster […]

  2. Question Mark @ the Intersections of Pre-Orders and Scribd Oyster etc | Felipe Adan Lerma - February 23, 2014

    […] Why I’m Uploading 50 Plus Titles to Scribd & Oyster […]

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